The Parent Infant Centre

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Welcome to ourNews, where we keep up-to-date with research and other news related to infant mental health. These articles can be of interest to both parents and professionals.
We are keen to know your views and so please do comment on our articles.
Is there a topic that you would like us to write about? Just send us a message via 'Contact us'.

ourNews

'The kids who beat autism'

Geoff Ferguson - August 3rd 2014  Read more

Babies who seem to self-correct their autism?

Sophie Williams - July 19th 2014 Read more

Brain activity shows babies rehearsing speech months before first words

Geoff Ferguson - July 19th 2014  Read more

One subtype of autism

Geoff Ferguson - July 12th 2014  Read more

Stress in pregnancy

Geoff Ferguson - June 5th 2014  Read more

Study shows no link between multiple vaccines and the risk of autism

A recent study shows that the number of childhood vaccines administered, either in a single day or during the first 2 years of life, has no bearing on the risk of autism. The study, published in the Journal of Pediatrics, was conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The study included over one thousand children, one quarter of the children had an autistic spectrum disorder and three quarters did not. The researchers could find no significant difference between the two groups in the total antigens from vaccines received by age 2 years or the maximum number of antigens received on a single day. The total amount of antigens from vaccines received was the same between children with ASD and those that did not have ASD. The study found that children with ASD with regression (the loss of developmental skills during the second year of life) did not receive an increased number of vaccine antigens when compared to children without ASD with regression. http://www.jpeds.com/webfiles/images/journals/ympd/JPEDSDeStefano.pdf

Mothers fight to pass Ava's Law for autism coverage

Parents press Georgia's State legislature to pass a law requiring insurance companies to pay for autism treatment. This is based upon the widely accepted evidence that early and intensive treatment can often make a difference to the child's prospects. http://edition.cnn.com/2013/03/12/health/autism-insurance-coverage/index.html

'Autism doesn't hold me back. I'm moving up the career ladder'

article Read more

Use of first words by 24 months a strong predictor of positive ASD outcomes

The age at which useful language is acquired provides a strong predictor of later outcomes for children diagnosed with ASD. A Connecticut study looked at the relationship between cognitive ability and adaptive behaviors at 52 months and the age that the child had first used single words to  communicate in a meaningful way. (Words that excluded 'mama' and 'dada'.) The study did not include children who had acquired and then lost some language. The study showed a strong correlation between acquiring these first words by the age of 24 months and later positive outcomes. 'Age of First Words Predicts Cognitive Ability and Adaptive Skills in Children with ASD.' Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders. Volume 43, Issue 2 , pp 253-264. http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10803-012-1558-0

Can children grow out of a diagnosis of ASD?

A recent study has looked at children who appear to have grown out of their diagnosis of autistic spectrum disorder. If these children have experienced real change, then this challenges the general assumption that ASDs are lifelong disabilities. The study set out to find if these children had been misdiagnosed initially or if they still exhibited subtle signs of autism. To conduct the study the researchers recruited three sets of school-age children and young adults: 34 with a prior diagnosis of ASD, but who now had no symptoms of the disorder (optimal outcome); 44 matched individuals with high-functioning autism; and 34 typically developing peers. The optimal outcome and typically developing groups did not differ significantly on mean test scores of communication, social interaction, face recognition, and most language subscales. This indicates that the children who had grown out of their diagnosis were now indistinguishable, with these tests, from their developmentally typical peers. However, when reviewing the children's initial diagnoses the researchers found that there was little early difference between those children now in the optimal outcome group and those now with high functioning autism. This suggests that the original ASD diagnoses were correct of those who now had an optimal outcome and that these changes are real. The researchers noted that although individuals in the optimal outcome and high functioning autistic groups showed equally severe difficulties initially with communication and repetitive behaviors, the optimal outcome group initially had milder symptoms of social dysfunction. Individuals in the optimal outcome group also had mean IQs in the high average range, bringing the possibility that their above average cognition may have helped them to compensate for social difficulties. The researchers acknowledged several limitations to the study, including that there may still be residual traces of ASD amongst the optimal outcome group that their research tools failed to detect. However, the study supports the observation that some children correctly receiving an initial diagnosis of ASD may eventually develop into individuals who are indistinguishable from those who have followed a more typical developmental path. Further work is needed to identify those factors that may help to predict or facilitate an optimal outcome, including effective treatment options. 'Optimal outcome in individuals with a history of autism.' Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry 54:2 (2013), pp 195–205 http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jcpp.12037/pdf

Welcome to ourNews, where we keep up-to-date with research and other news related to infant mental health. These articles can be of interest to both parents and professionals.
We are keen to know your views and so please do comment on our articles.
Is there a topic that you would like us to write about? Just send us a message via 'Contact us'.

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